Historic Attractions In And Around The North East

History – right on our doorstep.

The North East has a fascinating wealth of history. With heritage dating back to the Romans, Normans, and even the Bronze Age, it’s easy to uncover some of the region’s historical riches. Here are the best places to do so

Due to the ongoing COVID pandemic, local attractions may experience unforeseen restrictions and changes to their opening hours. To avoid disappointment, I strongly advise contacting the venues directly before visiting.


Alnwick Castle, Alnwick

One of Europe’s most iconic castles and the largest inhabited castle in England. Alnwick Castle has witnessed battles, rebellions, tragedy and romance. It’s also been home to a variety of interesting people from Harry Hotspur to Harry Potter.

Reopens: 29th March 2021 (grounds only)

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Adults from £10, Children from £5, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.alnwickcastle.com

Alnwick Castle

Auckland Castle, Deer House & Park, Bishop Auckland

Experience over 1,000 years of fascinating history as you walk in the footsteps of the Prince Bishops of Durham. Auckland Castle is one of the best-preserved bishops’ palaces in Europe and is at the centre of The Auckland Project.

Reopens: Deer Park is currently open. Auckland Castle is due to reopen soon.

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the Deer Park)

Entry Fee: Entry to the Deer Park is FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.aucklandproject.org/venues/auckland-castle/

Auckland Castle

Bamburgh Castle, Bamburgh

Bamburgh Castle, England’s finest coastal castle, towers 150 feet above the sea. Set on 9 acres with outstanding views, Bamburgh Castle allows you to explore thousands of years of Northumbrian history.

Reopens: 29th March 2021 (grounds only)

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Adults from £6, Children from £3, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.bamburghcastle.com

Bamburgh Castle

Barnard Castle, County Durham

Set on a high rock above the River Tees, Barnard Castle takes its name from its 12th century founder, Bernard de Balliol. With fantastic views over the Tees Gorge, the fortress sits on the fringe of the working market town.

Reopens: 29th March 2021

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Barnard Castle is an English Heritage property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £6.90, Children from £4.10, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/barnard-castle/

Barnard Castle

Beamish, Stanley

A living, working museum that tells the story of everyday life in the North East of England.

Reopens: 12th April 2021 (grounds only)

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Pay once and visit for a whole year. Adults from £19.50, Children from £11.50, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: http://www.beamish.org.uk

Beamish

Belsay Hall, Castle & Gardens, Belsay

Be enchanted by Belsay’s Grecian architecture, medieval castle and 30 acres of beautiful gardens. You can roam through the unique micro-climate of the Quarry Garden and enjoy the quirky spaces around the Hall.

Reopens: 29th March 2021 (grounds only)

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: ✅ (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Belsay Hall is an English Heritage property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £10, Children from £6, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/belsay-hall-castle-and-gardens/

Belsay Hall

Cherryburn, Mickley

The birthplace of Thomas Bewick

Reopens: TBC

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: TBC

Entry Fee: Cherryburn is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members entry fees for 2021 TBC

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/cherryburn

Cherryburn

Chillingham Castle, Chillingham

Chillingham Castle is a 13th century, Grade 1 Star-listed stronghold in Northumberland, famed for action and battles. With its fine rooms, gardens, lakes, fountains and tea rooms, the castle has an extraordinary ownership bloodline which runs back to the 1200s.

Reopens: 17th May 2021

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Adults from £10.50, Children from £6.50

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻👻👻

Website: https://chillingham-castle.com

Chillingham Castle

Cragside, Rothbury

Cragside was created by two remarkable individuals, Lord William and Lady Margaret Armstrong. With Lord Armstrong’s passion for engineering and innovation mixed with Lady Armstrong’s love of natural sciences; this duo created the Cragside estate we know today. Together they transformed a rocky Northumberland heathland into an efficient landscape to create the first house in the world to be lit by electricity.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: ✅ (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Cragside is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £8, Children from £4

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/cragside

Cragside

Durham Cathedral, Durham

Durham Cathedral is one of Europe’s finest Romanesque cathedrals, perching high on the wooded peninsula of Durham City overlooking the River Wear. Built as the Shrine of St Cuthbert and also the burial place of the Venerable Bede, Durham Cathedral is unforgettably part of the cultural and religious history of the North East of England.

Reopens: TBC

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Suggested donation of £3

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.durhamcathedral.co.uk

Durham Cathedral

Gibside, Gateshead

Gibside is one of a few surviving 18th-century designed landscapes and was fashioned with two things in mind: spectacular views and ‘wow’ moments. The estate, commissioned by coal baron George Bowes, offers a glimpse into the past and the compelling story of heiress Mary Eleanor Bowes.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Gibside is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £8, Children from £4

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/gibside

Gibside

Hadrian’s Wall

Stretching 73 miles from coast to coast, Hadrian’s Wall was built to guard the wild north-west frontier of the Roman Empire. Discover the remains of the forts, towers, turrets and towns that once kept watch over the Wall.

Reopens: January 2021

Carpark: ✅ (at the forts)

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: FREE to visit the wall, charges apply at the forts.

Food/Drink Options: ✅ (at the forts)

Toilets: (at the forts)

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/hadrians-wall/

Sycamore Gap

Jarrow Hall, Jarrow

Travel back in time to Anglo-Saxon Britain at Jarrow Hall – Anglo-Saxon Farm, Village and Bede Museum, a historic and environmental oasis in the heart of South Tyneside.

Reopens: 13th April 2021 (grounds only)

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: Usually super dog friendly however there are restrictions currently in place due to avian flu – these should be lifted once all bird migration has stopped.

Entry Fee: Pay once and visit for the rest of the season. Adults from £7, Children from £4, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://jarrowhall.com

Jarrow Hall

Lindisfarne Castle, Holy Island

Years of stories, discoveries and contradictions in a castle (that’s not a castle), on an island (that’s not an island).

Reopens: TBC

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: ✅ (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Lindisfarne Castle is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members entry fees for 2021 TBC

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lindisfarne-castle

Lindisfarne Priory

Newcastle Castle & The Black Gate, Newcastle

Steeped in history, this imposing Norman fortress is a rugged reminder of northern England’s turbulent past. Newcastle Castle is where the story of Newcastle began and the reason it got its name.

Reopens: TBC

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: TBC

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻👻

Website: https://www.newcastlecastle.co.uk

The Black Gate

Ormesby Hall, Middlesbrough

Home to the Pennyman family, Ormesby Hall, garden and parkland is a green oasis in the heart of industrial Middlesbrough.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Ormesby Hall is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £4, Children from £2

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ormesby-hall

Ormesby Hall

Raby Castle, Darlington

Raby is without doubt one of the most impressive intact castles in the North of England. Built in the 14th century by the powerful Nevill family, it has a fascinating history.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Adults from £8, Children from £4, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.raby.co.uk

Raby Castle

Seaton Delaval Hall, Seaton Delaval

Seaton Delaval may have been one of the architect Sir John Vanbrugh’s smallest country houses; but it was home to the larger than life Delaval family. The house and surrounding landscape were in keeping with the style expected in Georgian society, yet behind the formality lies a story of theatrical mischief.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Seaton Delaval Hall is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £8, Children from £4

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/seaton-delaval-hall

Seaton Delaval Hall

Tynemouth Priory, Tynemouth

Tynemouth Castle and Priory on the coast of North East England was once one of the largest fortified areas in England. Overlooking the North Sea and the River Tyne, it dominates the headland.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Tynemouth Priory is an English Heritage property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £6.90, Children from £4.10, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/tynemouth-priory-and-castle/

Tynemouth Priory

Ushaw, Durham

Ushaw Historic House, Chapels & Gardens is a majestic estate in the heart of the Durham countryside.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Adults from £6, Children from £4

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.ushaw.org

Ushaw

Victoria Tunnels, Ouseburn

The Victoria Tunnel is a subterranean waggonway that runs under Newcastle, from the Town Moor down to the River Tyne. It was built between 1839 and 1842 to transport coal from Leazes Main Colliery in Spital Tongues to riverside staithes ready for loading onto boats for export.

Reopens: TBC

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: TBC

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻👻

Website: https://www.ouseburntrust.org.uk/visit-vt

Victoria Tunnel

Warkworth Castle, Warkworth

Enjoy a day out at this mighty Northumberland fortress crowning the hilltop above the River Coquet, and see how the powerful Dukes of Northumberland, the Percy family lived.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Warkworth Castle is an English Heritage property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £7.90, Children from £4.70, Under 5’s FREE

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/warkworth-castle-and-hermitage

Warkworth Castle

Wallington, Cambo

The Trevelyan family, who used to live on the 13,000 acre estate, loved being outdoors and close to nature. The house is surrounded by an informal landscape of lawns, lakes, woodland, parkland and farmland, just waiting to be explored.

Reopens: Grounds are open

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: ✅ (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Wallington is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members, Adults from £13, Children from £6.50

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wallington

Wallington

Washington Old Hall, Washington

At the heart of historic Washington village this picturesque stone manor house and its gardens provide a tranquil oasis, reflecting gentry life following the turbulence of the English Civil War.

Reopens: TBC

Carpark:

Dog Friendly: (in the grounds)

Entry Fee: Washington Old Hall is a National Trust property so entry is free for members. Non-members entry fees for 2021 TBC

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/washington-old-hall

Washington Old Hall

Woodhorn Colliery, Ashington

Reopens: 19th May 2021

Carpark:

Dog Friendly:

Entry Fee: Adults £7, Concessions £6, 16s and Under FREE. Pay once and enjoy unlimited visits for 12 months

Food/Drink Options:

Toilets:

Spooky Rating: 👻

Website: http://www.museumsnorthumberland.org.uk/


Where’s your favourite North Eastern Historic Attraction? Let me know in the comments


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